FANDOM


    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


THERAPEUTICS CASE STUDIES 1

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


RX 403

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Fall 2010 Syllabus

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


COURSE DESCRIPTION: A case-based approach to the assessment, development and monitoring of therapeutic plans for selected disease states.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


PREREQUISITES: Concurrent RX413 (Therapeutics 1) and Principles of Drug Action (RX 411) or permission of the course director.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


CREDIT: For undergraduate credit only. 1 hour

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


SCHEDULING: Friday from 2:00 to 4:50 PM unless otherwise noted on RX403/413 course schedule

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Locations: JH141, GH102, PB212, PB205, PB202, PB015, PB106 A&B, and PB309
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Note: Please read schedule carefully to determine whether to report to JH141 for group work or to the room assigned to individual sections!!
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Student athletes are asked to submit a list of known dates of travel/conflict by Tuesday, September 7th
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Disclaimer: This syllabus is a living document and will be referred to throughout the course. As such, there may be a need for additions, deletions, or modifications of it throughout the semester. The integrative nature of this course lends itself to flexibility in scheduling activities. This is a necessary feature to maintain the quality of the course. Students and other involved faculty will be notified immediately if/when changes are made.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


COURSE DIRECTORS: Dr. Tracy Sprunger. Please refer to table below for all contact information. If you are unable to reach Dr. Sprunger, please leave a message with the Course Coordinator, Ms. Susan Morton, PB305, phone 940-9467.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology

Course Directors

Butler Office

Email

Phone

Primary Site

Tracy Sprunger

PB203E

tsprunge@butler.edu

940-6145

Butler University

Faculty – Case Studies Section Preceptors

Dr. Tracy Costello

tcostello@ecommunity.com

355-2810

Community East

Dr. Emily Papineau

epapinea@butler.edu

355-2150

Community East

Dr. Jessica Wilhoite

jwilhoit@butler.edu

338-7716

St. Vincent

Adjunct Faculty – Case Studies Section Preceptors

Dr. Andrea Bishop

andrea.bishop@v.gov

VAMC

Dr. Josh Elder

jelder@clarian.org

Clarian Health

Dr. Isabel Hagedorn

ihagedor@butler.edu

Butler University

Dr. Katie Hinkle

khinkle2@clarian.org

Clarian Health

Dr. Megan Hinkley

mhinkley@clarianarnett.com

Clarian Health

Dr. Carolyn Jacobs

cjacobs@ecommunity.com

Community East

Dr. Emily Milewski

emilewsk@ecommunity.com

Clarian Health

Dr. Lauren Miller

lmille21@clarian.org

Clarian Health

Dr. Kara Nedderman

knedderman@ecommunity.com

Community

Dr. Lalita Prasad

lprasad@clarian.org

Clarian Health

Dr. Amy Pullen

apullen2@ecommunity.com

Wellspring

Dr. Sheena Sanders

sxsande1@stvincent.org

St. Vincent

Dr. Erin Weber

eweber@ecommunity.com

Wellspring

Dr. Kristen Wilcox

kwilcox2@ecommunity.com

Community

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


COURSE INSTRUCTORS:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


CONTACTING FACULTY & OFFICE HOURS: Drop-in office hours for Dr. Sprunger are Wednesdays 10am – 12am or by appointment. For most faculty, it is best to send an email requesting a specific time to discuss questions or to schedule a special appointment. When sending email to faculty, include the course number in the subject line, and your name, a return email address and a phone number in the body of your message.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


BACKGROUND AND FOUNDATION: Therapeutics Case Studies (RX 403) is a companion course to Therapeutics 1 (RX 413), and is the first in a series of four courses that focus on the process of caring for patients using standardized treatment strategies that ensure quality care. The Case Studies courses guide students to develop the skills required to identify and resolve drug-related problems through the use of patient case scenarios. The courses involve students in active learning and promote the development of self-directed learning. The case discussion allows simulation, problem analysis, decision-making, oral communication and teamwork. The case discussions are as much about the process of solving patient-related health problems as about the actual answers. In fact, many times there are several possible solutions to the problem. A necessary skill for all clinicians to develop is the ability to summarize the relevant information and to direct their attention to the important aspects of the cases. Case discussions will facilitate development of these skills as well.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


The CARE PLAN process for pharmacists is a systematic method that is used to identify, prioritize, resolve and prevent drug-therapy problems. There are several methods for documenting clinical interventions and communicating findings with other health professionals. In the initial Case Studies courses, students will use the S-O-A-P system to develop expanded notes in the form of a care plan. Students will use the care plan format to delineate their steps in developing patient plans that ensure that both the non-drug and drug therapy needs of the patient are met. The emphasis in this course will be on using the subjective and objective data from the case to IDENTIFY and PRIORITIZE the problems presented in the case, and then begin to ASSESS and RECOMMEND treatment for drug-related problems. In addition, drug information skills will be applied throughout this course. (Please see the separate document, Drug information Related Expectations for Case Studies, for a detailed description of minimum expectations.) When preparing individualized patient care plans, be sure to evaluate all medication regimens for potential drug interactions, using one of the drug information databases identified. Databases are also useful to determine appropriate dosing regimens and to predict/prevent/manage drug induced problems. Also, always consider cost when making recommendation regarding drug therapy.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


PHARMACY PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ADDRESSED IN THIS COURSE:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


The pharmacotherapy specialist design, implements, monitors, evaluates and modifies patient pharmacotherapy to ensure effective, safe and economical patient care. This course will help students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to assume this role in patient care.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


The activities in Therapeutics Case Studies further students’ liberal arts education by providing an environment in which facts about disease states and pharmaceutical agents are applied to solve problems related to patient care. This problem-solving requires students to use critical thinking and scientific inquiry in both cooperative groups and as individuals.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


COURSE PHILOSOPHY AND GOALS: By the end of this course – for given disease states, students are expected to be able to:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


In order to meet these goals, the course will cultivate students’ abilities to:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Schwinghammer TL, Koehler JM, eds., Pharmacotherapy casebook: A patient-focused approach, 7th Edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2008.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


In addition to the assigned textbook, lecturers will identify required and/or recommended readings from a variety of sources. These may include primary literature, seminal reviews, practice guidelines, etc.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


See the RX413 Fall 2010 syllabus for information regarding required the required textbook as well as any required or recommended readings. It is the student’s responsibility to bring appropriate materials as required for class or Case Studies exercises.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


ATTENDANCE POLICIES: Because of the structure of the Case Studies discussion sessions, attendance at each session is required. If students know in advance that they will miss a session for a University sponsored event (student athletes) or other significant event, discuss the anticipated scheduling conflict with the course director.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Absence from a Case Studies session will be excused for personal illness or for death in the immediate family with appropriate written verification. All absences must be explained IN WRITING to the Course Director and must be accompanied by written verification of the illness or death. An unexcused absence will result in the grade of zero points for the quiz for that day (if a quiz is scheduled). All questions concerning absences not explained by the above should be directed to the course director. Student athletes are asked to submit a list of known dates of travel/conflict by Tuesday, September 7th, 2010.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


If, due to an unforseen emergency or illness, a student determines that he/she will be unable to attend Case Studies, the student should contact the course director and the appropriate Case Studies preceptor(s) ASAP, preferably IN ADVANCE, either via email or phone message. The Course Director may request subsequent documentation of the reason for the absence in order to determine whether the absence will be excused or unexcused, and how any missed work from the day will be handled.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


case studies DESCRIPTION: During Case Studies discussion sessions, emphasis is placed upon the students’ development of skills in verbalizing, integration and reinforcement of information learned from lectures, readings and previous coursework. Oral participation is a primary objective of these sessions. Students must be able to consistently verbalize clear, concise thoughts to peers and others in this group setting.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Case Studies discussion sessions are NOT meant to be a lecture. Faculty and/or adjunct faculty preceptors will facilitate the discussions. However, students are responsible for the application of the material to the specific case. It is important that students come to Case Studies discussion sessions prepared not only to learn, but also to interact with and teach fellow classmates.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Patient cases will have multiple disease states, including drug-induced or drug-related problems. During Case Studies, groups will discuss, prioritize, and develop a complete care plan to address the primary problem including drug induced problems.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


More than one acceptable approach to the management of the assigned problems in the cases is possible. The care plan should be based solely upon the information provided in the case. If additional information is needed, ask the Case Studies preceptor. If it is felt that assumptions are necessary, indicate these as part of the care plan assessment.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


CASE STUDIES FORMAT: During each Case Studies discussion Session, students will work within the subgroups assigned in their respective section. Case Studies discussions are open note, open book, and the use of medical electronic databases are encouraged. Students may use any resources they choose to bring. However, if use of a resource inhibits a student’s participation or adversely affects the participation of their peers, this will be addressed with the student by the Case Studies preceptor(s). Students are free to take a restroom break any time after the quiz.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Each session will be ~135 minutes in length. Students are expected to wear clearly visible name tags, as well as dress and behave in accordance with the COPHS policies.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


The general format for each week is outlined below; however, the uniqueness of the individual cases may necessitate slight modifications in the format.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Care Plan Submissions: Students will be required to submit Care Plans throughout the semester to demonstrate their mastery of the care planning process, and of the skills involved in documenting their planning results and recommendations. While the discussions that occur in the classroom are collaborative ones, the work involved in writing a Care Plan is expected to be that of the individual student.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Care Plans will be submitted as assignments via the RX403 Blackboard site by 5pm on the Monday following the class when the case was originally discussed. No exceptions to this policy will be allowed. Late submissions will not be accepted. Submissions without a name or submitted to an incorrect site will not be accepted. Students with an EXCUSED absence from Case Studies may still submit a care plan, but will not be given a time extension. A student must discuss excused absences and/or make-up work for Case Studies directly with the Course Directors.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


The Care Plan document file-name must conform to the following pattern:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


MBXXX_CP_DateofCase Studies (where XXX is your mailbox number, including leading zeros)
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Example: for Mailbox number 15, case distributed September 6, 2010:
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


the document file name would be: MB015_CP_090610
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Grading Criteria RX403The grading criteria for the course is outlined in the following table:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology

Activity or Assessment

Possible Points

Total Possible Points

Preparation Points (Quizzes)

70

225

Weekly Care Plans

80

Individual ORAL Case Presentation

75

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Preparation Points (Quizzes)

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Eight scheduled quizzes will be administered according to the lecture schedule on Friday, at the beginning of Therapeutics Case Studies. The the lowest quiz score will be dropped. In the event that a student misses case studies the quiz for that day will count for the dropped quiz. Students may refer to the Case Studies schedule for location. In general, the quizzes will consist of ~10 questions. Quiz questions may also be drawn from readings assigned but not necessarily discussed in class. Quizzes are closed notes, closed book. When quizzes are administered via Blackboard, no other programs are allowed to be running or open on student computers. Students found to have ANY programs open or running including instant messaging during quiz will receive a zero for that quiz and not be allowed to drop a quiz score at the end of the semester. In addition, students in violation of this rule will appear before the College’s Academic and Professional Affairs Committee. All quizzes will be administered at the same time, no additional time will be given to students who are late. It is the student’s responsibility to check the gradebook to assure that the quiz score is posted before the quiz answers are discussed in Case Studies. Answers to quizzes will be discussed during Case Studies. Make-up quizzes will NOT be administered.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Weekly Care Plans

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Students will be required to submit a Care Plan for each case discussed. In the event that a student does not pass on the

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


first submission the student will have the opportunity to resubmit a Care Plan for re-assessment, at which time the highest

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


grade possible is a 7/10. The second attempted Care Plan must be resubmitted within 48 hours from the return of the failed

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


original Care Plan. If the second Care Plan does not meet the criteria for a “Pass” (see below), a grade of 0/10 will be

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


given. NOTE: Students are required to submit a Care Plan even if absent from case studies. In extenuating

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


circumstances, any student needing additional time for submission of a Care Plan must receive

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


approval from the Course Directors and/or Case Preceptor.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Care Plan Scoring is based on the following scale:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Pass (P) –10 points on first attempt; 7 points on second attempt – care plan developed with appropriate assessment and prioritization of problems, provided goals and plans for assigned problems and drug-induced problems, appropriate and patient-specific therapeutic recommendations with complete dosing regimens, rationale for recommendations, appropriate patient education, few minor errors or omissions
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


No Pass (NP) – 0 points -significant errors or omissions, recommendation(s) that could lead to a sentinel event, lack of clarity, patient specificity and/or appearance of minimal effort

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


Individual Oral Case Discussion

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


One Individual Oral Case Discussion session will occur during a regularly scheduled Case Studies time period during the semester. Students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate their skills at verbally presenting a patient case and care plan in a clear, concise, and professional manner. Students will be presenting in front of faculty and peers. The case utilized for the Individual Oral Case Discussion session will be chosen from the Pharmacotherapy Casebook and will be identified for the students well in advance of the scheduled session. Students are expected to dress professionally, wearing white coats and nametags.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


If a student fails the individual case presentation, he/she will be allowed to repeat the exercise. The repeat exercise will be similar but not identical in content to the original assessment. On a repeat examination, the highest score a student can earn is 75% of the possible points available on the exercise. If a student fails the repeat individual presentation, the student will fail the course. For this reason, students are strongly encouraged to meet with the Course Directors after the failed 1st attempt to identify strategies to assure success on the repeat exercise.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


course and Instructor Evaluations: Students in this course play an important role in its evaluation. Changes are made on an annual basis based upon the feedback from both students and instructors. This is a very valuable process, as the responses will assist the faculty in evaluating different aspects of the course and making improvements for the following year's class. All responses will remain anonymous and will not be reviewed by lecturers until after the final grades have been submitted. To assure anonymity, course and faculty evaluations will be completed on-line.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


A message will be sent to students’ Butler e-mail accounts with instructions and the link(s) for evaluation completion. The evaluation process will be discussed prior to the sending of the email.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


REQUEST FOR RE-GRADE: It is recognized that there may be times when a student feels an assessment has been graded improperly. The assessment may be submitted as "Request for Consideration of Regrade". Any material submitted for re-evaluation of grading must not be altered from the original work; such alteration would be considered a violation of academic integrity. Any additional comments or clarification should be clearly marked and labeled as such.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


To standardize the procedure for re-evaluation of graded items, the following procedures and hierarchy will apply:

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


GENERAL AND COPHS ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR DISABILITIES. It is the policy and practice of Butler University to make reasonable accommodations for students with properly documented disabilities. Written notification from Student Disability Services is required. If you are eligible to receive an accommodation and would like to request it for this course, please discuss it with me and allow one week advance notice. Otherwise, it is not guaranteed that the accommodation can be received on a timely basis. Students who have questions about Student Disability Services or who have, or think they may have, a disability (psychiatric, attentional, learning, vision, hearing, physical, medical, etc.) are invited to contact Student Disability Services for a confidential discussion in Jordan Hall 136 or by phone at extension 9308.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY. As student pharmacists or student physician assistants, all enrollees in COPHS professional courses are expected to adhere to professional decorum in all activities related to this course and the COPHS programs. As professionals, students are responsible for their own attendance, preparedness, handling of common COPHS resources and equipment, participation, and ultimately their performance in this course.

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY. Academic dishonesty in all its manifestations is unacceptable behavior and is inconsistent with the professional integrity necessary to be a health care practitioner. Students must be fully aware of what constitutes academic dishonesty; claims of ignorance cannot be used to justify or rationalize dishonest acts. Behaviors which constitute academic dishonesty are clearly described in the Professional Conduct Code of the College which is contained in the COPHS Student Handbook and in Blackboard under the COPHS section. Students in COPHS courses are expected to read and to abide by this policy. The procedures outlined in this policy will be followed should any breach of academic integrity occur in this course. (Faculty may want to insert additional wording regarding a specific course sanction should cheating, plagiarism or fabrication be found to have occurred in the course)

    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology


PLAGIARISM. Plagiarism is one specific example of academic dishonesty that is often misunderstood by students. Plagiarism is defined as “the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one’s own original work.” Appropriate paraphrasing and proper referencing are necessary to avoid plagiarism. Please refer to the COPHS Citation Guide, available in the COPHS section of Blackboard, for proper referencing/citation formats. Students in COPHS courses are expected to read these guidelines and to adhere to them in the submission of all written assignments. All instances of plagiarism occurring in this course will be addressed as outlined in the COPHS Professional Conduct Code.
    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instructor responsible for the exam/quiz question or for grading the assignment. Requests should be done via email, with a CC to Dr. Sprunger. Include the course, assignment/question and the number of points involved, along with a brief rationale and references that support your request. Regrade requests should also include the student’s phone number.
  10. The faculty may request, and the student should be prepared to provide, all original work as submitted and copies of any documentation to support the regrade request.
    • The hierarchy for acceptable documentation is listed below. Student written notes are not considered as adequate documentation, due to their variability.
      1. Therapeutics Course Lecturer or Therapeutics Lecture Handout
      2. Therapeutics assigned reading(s) (required or recommended)
      3. Micromedex
      4. Lexi-Comp or Clinical Pharmacology



    • Apply knowledge and skills to make appropriate decisions regarding the safe and effective use of medication or the need for referral to other health care providers. These decisions should include consideration of social, economic, and cultural factors.
    • Find, understand, analyze, evaluate and use information to make informed and rational decisions.
    • Effectively communicate pharmaceutical and health-related information and collaborate with other healthcare professionals to ensure the provision of quality patient care
    • Practice independent learning and modify ideas and behaviors based on newly acquired knowledge
    • Demonstrate ethical conduct in personal and professional settings and respect and exhibit empathy for patients’ differences, values, and preferences
    • Promote health improvement, wellness and disease prevention.
    • Assemble and analyze a patient database
    • Determine if pertinent and/or relevant information for the database is missing or needed
    • Apply known information about the drug, the disease state and/or the patient parameters to the specific case questions
    • Develop a patient-specific strategy and document that strategy in the form of a written care plan
    • Identify, prioritize and solve drug-related problems such as drug-drug, drug-lab test and drug-food interactions
    • Anticipate drug therapy-related problems and provide recommendations or interventions that will minimize or eliminate the problem
    • Understand and extract key information from a case or a patient database
    • Empirically dose based on patient characteristics
    • Construct and explain a written pharmacotherapeutic care plan including a plan to monitor the outcomes of therapy
    • Utilize drug information skills to identify, resolve or prevent drug related problems
    • Effectively communicate using appropriate written and verbal skills
    • Accept and offer divergent opinions
  1. Convene in either large classroom or individual section rooms to take quiz. Once quiz is complete and students are in their designated Case Studies room, desks/chairs should be arranged in students’ respective subgroups so that all students in the group are facing each other, and preceptors have room to circulate among the groups.
  2. Case Studies preceptors will discuss format for the day’s session, as well as distribute the any handouts. Student(s) will read the case aloud, correcting mispronunciations of medical terms and clarifying any abbreviations used in the case write-up.
  3. Students will work as a group discussing and working thorough the case by initially identifying and prioritizing the problems. All students are expected to contribute to the discussion. The primary goal is to build a Care Plan, by SOAPing each problem, developing a consensus of assessments, recommendations, points of patient education for each of the problems, and answering any assigned discussion questions. Case Studies preceptors will circulate among the groups to facilitate the discussion, address questions and assist the discussion as needed. In addition, preceptors will ensure that the student group addresses the following: identification and prioritization of problems, points of emphasis for the case, and identification of drug induced or drug related problems (DIPs).
  4. Focus of the discussions should be patient specific and address the following, as appropriate:
    • Assessment of current therapy, assessment of therapeutic options.
    • Acute and chronic management strategies when applicable
    • Recommendation of the best therapeutic plan for this patient including drug(s), dose(s), route(s), regimen(s), duration, special precautions
    • Key drug dosing and drug administration issues
    • Appropriate monitoring of disease and drug therapy
    • Alternative plans and therapies
    • Therapeutic implications when dealing with different patient groups
    • Key references to search when questions related to this topic arise
    • Any legal or ethical issues or economic impact of various therapies
    • Key points of patient counseling and/or education
    • Questioning of the patient by the pharmacist to assess therapeutic outcomes
    • Simulation of communication with other health care providers
    • Critique of peer recommendations or assessments in an appropriate manner
  5. After group work is completed, individual groups’ recommendations will be discussed with the entire class. Case Studies preceptors may ask each group to post their recommendations on the board. For each problem, a subgroup member will lead the class discussion reviewing and critiquing the various recommendations posted. Particular areas of needed patient education/counseling should also be noted.
  6. The preceptor will summarize the major points of emphasis and address any remaining student questions, including any questions about that day’s quiz. The preceptor will clarify the expectations and time lines for submission of the written documentation required for that particular week’s case.
  7. Finally, the preceptor will return any previous assignments, and ask the students to return the room to its original configuration.
  8. Students have 1 week after an assignment or test has been returned or a grade posted to submit a request for a regrade. Individual students are responsible for preparing their own justification for their regrade request; the request must represent their own work.
  9. Students must submit their request directly to the instr